SOUTH SHORE RECYCLING COOPERATIVE

 

 
 
 

Radio Ads

WATD Tania Kevin Julie Merle Lorraine

The South Shore Recycling Cooperative has made numerous public service broadcast announcements on area radio stations to spread the word about recycling, hazardous waste, and related topics.  The four most recent run from 3/14/18-5/14/18.

Listening to these spots is an entertaining way to increase your recycling knowledge! Click on 'Listen' to hear these broadcasts.

Special thanks to WATD 959, for recording and distributing the ads, and providing some free airtime.

 

Hot tip on compost bins   Listen

Recorded at WATD in 2018 by Tania Keeble (Recolor Paint), Lorraine Mavrogeorge (Abington BOH, SSRC Board), Merle Brown (Cohasset, SSRC Chairman), and Julie Sullivan (SSRC)

T: Hello, your friends here at South Shore Recycling Cooperative!

M: We have a hot tip for you.

J:  Did you know that yard waste and kitchen scraps are too ­good for the trash?

L: We can help you turn your leaves, banana peels, coffee grounds and used paper towels into a superfood for your plants right in your own backyard.

M: To help, a bunch of our towns are selling compost bins cheap!

T: With some water and an occasional stir, magic microbes will transform your garbage naturally into black gold called compost that will help your garden thrive.

J: you can use compost instead of chemical fertilizers and pesticides that can contaminate our drinking water, and kill bees and other pollinators.

L: The towns of Abington, Cohasset, Hanson, Kingston, Middleboro, Plymouth, Rockland and a few others offer cut rate bins to residents through a grant from MassDEP. 

M: It’ll save you money on fertilizer, and save on your trash costs too.

T: For more information, go to southshorerecycling.org,

More on backyard composting here


Mercury in the basement   Listen

Managing mercury in a moveout    Listen

produced and recorded by Grand Cove Productions, funded by Covanta SEMASS


Bag the plastic bags         Listen

Recorded at WATD in 2018 by Tania Keeble (Recolor Paint), Lorraine Mavrogeorge (Abington BOH, SSRC Board), Merle Brown (Cohasset, SSRC Chairman), and Julie Sullivan (SSRC)

T Hello! Your friends, here, from South Shore Recycling Cooperative

L We have a simple message for you

M Bag the plastic bags! 

J Putting plastic bags in with your bottles and paper are actually HARMING our recycling efforts

L They get tangled up in the sorting machinery – causing everything to grind to a halt while workers cut them out

M They slow down the sorting lines too, along with all the other things that don’t belong – time is money!

T  The only plastics that your town’s program can sort and sell are bottles and rigid containers

L We know you mean well, but please bag the plastic bags – and bring them back to the supermarket. 

M: Remember to bring your reusable bags in too.  Cutting down on disposables is a win for all of us!

J  To give your recyclables a second chance, please keep plastic bags and film out of your paper, cardboard, and rigid container recycling.   

T  Reduce, reuse, and Relearn how to recycle right – visit southshorerecycling.org

More on how to recycle right here

More on how to recycle plastic bags and wraps here 


We can’t recycle garbage       Listen

Recorded at WATD in 2018 by Tania Keeble (Recolor Paint), Lorraine Mavrogeorge (Abington BOH, SSRC Board), Merle Brown (Cohasset, SSRC Chairman), and Julie Sullivan (SSRC)

T Hello! Your friends, here, from South Shore Recycling Cooperative

J We have an important message for you

M We can’t recycle garbage!

L We’re talking pizza cheese, that last spoonful of milk, the ketchup that stuck to the sides of the bottle...

T  You know how nasty garbage smells after a few days, right?   Pee-Ugh

J  Greasy pizza boxes and unrinsed containers can stink up a whole recycling load.  You have to have a strong stomach to work on a sorting line, especially in hot weather

M And what mill wants to buy a bale of smelly, moldy paper?

 L Yeah, the point of recycling is to make it into new products – you can’t make paper out of cheese!

J  It doesn’t need to be sterile, but please give food containers a rinse before recycling.  And hold the pizza!

T  Reduce, reuse, and relearn how to recycle right,, and more– visit southshorerecycling.org

More on how to recycle right here


Good, bad, or ugly, used textiles are too good for the trash         Listen

Recorded at WATD in 2018 by Tania Keeble (Recolor Paint), Lorraine Mavrogeorge (Abington BOH, SSRC Board), Merle Brown (Cohasset, SSRC Chairman), and Julie Sullivan (SSRC)

T  The seasons are changing, and so are your clothes

J Ready to pull your old favorite back out of storage?

L Of course, not everything is going to be a keeper, so what do you do?

T Hello, we’re your friends from the South Shore Recycling Cooperative!

J Donation is a GREAT way to take care of unwanted clothes – whether they look like new or have seen better days

M Did you know you can even donate worn-out textiles?

L Good, bad or ugly, most used textiles are still too good for the trash.  Bring them to a donation box, and those old clothes will be put to some good use.

M As long as they’re clean and dry.

J Schools and towns even get paid for clothes, shoes, and household linens collected in their boxes. 

T Reduce, reuse and Relearn how to recycle right – visit South Shore Recycling dot org

 

More on how to repurpose clothing and textiles here


 

Recycle your paper   Listen

Recorded at WATD by Steve Herrmann (Hanover) and Claire Sullivan (SSRC)        

C:  “The next time you get a log for the fire, grab a newspaper in your other hand   Consider the fuel, chemicals and water it takes to transform that log into the daily news, along with air and water pollution and destroyed habitat.   

S:  The average household discards half a ton of paper and cardboard each year.  If you’re separating all your old mail, catalogs, newspapers, cartons and cereal boxes from the trash, you’re making the world a better place, and keeping your town’s trash fee down too.  How much difference are you making?

C  Recycling 2 bags of paper a week keeps 8 trees in the forest, saves 100 gallons of fuel, and keeps 4 tons of carbon dioxide and other pollutants out of the air each year.  And those trees you saved make 4 tons of oxygen for us to breathe. 

S:  Wasting all that good paper pollutes our air, costs money and fuels our need for more landfills.

C:  The South Shore Recycling Cooperative asks you to put a bag next to your trash can for all your clean paper and cardboard.  A little effort makes a big difference.

S:  For more information, go to ssrcoop.info.”

Paper Industry Association Council


Recycle your paper – facts     Listen
Recorded at WATD by Claire Sullivan (SSRC)        

“When you bring in your Christmas catalogs from the mailbox today, consider the fuel, chemicals and water it takes to transform them from trees.

How much of a difference does it make to separate your paper from the trash?

Recycling 2 bags of paper a week keeps 8 trees in the forest, saves 100 gallons of fuel, and keeps 4 tons of carbon dioxide out of the air each year. 

So the South Shore Recycling Cooperative asks you to put a bag next to your trash for all your clean paper and cardboard.  A little effort makes a big difference.

For more information, go to ssrc.info.” 

Paper Industry Association Council


Recycle your paper – general     Listen 
Recorded at WATD by Steve Herrmann (Hanover)

“The next time you get a log for the fire, grab a newspaper in your other hand   To transform that log into the daily news is a nasty process that pollutes our air and water and destroys habitat.   

The average household discards half a ton of paper and cardboard each year.  If you’re separating your recyclable paper products from the trash, you’re making the world a better place, and keeping your town’s trash fee down too. 

So the South Shore Recycling Cooperative asks you to please recycle all your clean paper and cardboard.  A little effort makes a big difference.”

Paper Industry Association Council


Buy recycled paper    Listen
Recorded at WATD by Deb Sullivan (Marshfield) and Claire Sullivan (SSRC)

DS:  “Ever wonder how your paper is made? Between home, work and school, an average household consumes a ton of paper products each year!  And believe it or not, most of it is stillmade from wood pulp soup.  Here’s a standard recipe.  Take 17 trees, chopped and chipped, and enough fuel to run your house for 2 months.   Pressure cook in lye for a few hours, acid wash, bleach if needed, and dry. 

CS:  But there’s an easier way. Making paper from the urban forest is much cleaner and gentler.  Your newspaper has about half recycled content, and your own waste paper could be in your cereal box.  Did you know that you can choose recycled content paper by just taking a minute to look for it?  Recycled copy paper is now just as good as virgin.  Use both sides to get the most out of it!  Recycled paper towels, envelopes and greeting cards are out there too.

DS:  So save the forest, close the loop and buy recycled!  A little effort makes a big difference.

CS:  Brought to you by the South Shore Recycling Cooperative.” 

 


Cost of wasted paper     Listen
Recorded by Deb Sullivan (Marshfield)

“Take 6 trees, chopped and chipped, and enough fuel to run your house for 3 weeks.   Boil in lye for a few hours, acid wash, bleach, and dry.  What is it?  Just enough paper to supply one American for a year.

It’s a lot easier to make paper from paper.  Half of your newspaper is recycled, and no birds lost their homes for your cereal box.  The South Shore Recycling Cooperative recommends that you choose recycled content office products, greeting cards and tissues too.  The quality won’t disappoint you.

Close the loop, buy recycled.” 


Waste Bans      Listen
Recorded at WATD by Deb Sullivan (Marshfield) and Claire Sullivan (SSRC)

CS: “What’s in your trash? The South Shore Recycling Cooperative wants you to know that if you’re not recycling, your town could get in trouble.  State regulations called “Waste Bans” prohibit some common products that are either too good or too bad from being trashed, including cardboard, paper, bottles and cans, yard waste, TVs, appliances, and tires.  That goes for businesses too.

The State means business, and if they find banned items in the trash at your disposal facility, your town will be fined.  Who pays? You and your neighbors, out of your tax dollars!

DS: Our towns make it easy to recycle.  There might be a fee for the difficult to manage items.  But recycling or composting the useful materials costs less than trash, and it saves us all a lot more than money.

CS: Salvaging the good stuff cuts our need for oil, keeps our air and water cleaner and saves resources for the next generations. 

DS: To learn more about the waste bans, go to ssrc.info.  Recycle: a little effort makes a big difference.” Click here for more info


Another Kind of Black Gold    Listen
Recorded at WATD by Michelle Roberts, Abington

“The South Shore Recycling Cooperative wants to teach you an amazing trick!  To turn nearly half of your trash into greener, healthier plants, you can put your leaves, grass clippings and many kitchen scraps in a backyard pile to make compost.

The Mass. Dept. of Environmental Protection bans leaves and grass clippings from the trash because they’re too good to trash!  So most towns in our area provide special curbside collections or a drop off compost site for residents’ yard waste.

But if you have a little space in your yard, it’s just as easy to pile it up, wet it down and compost it yourself!  And if you throw in your plant- derived kitchen scraps like apple cores, coffee grounds, and past their prime potatoes, you’ll get even richer fertilizer.  Cover them with leaves, or used paper towels.  With some water and an occasional stir, in about 6 months magic soil critters will transform your leaves and leftovers into black gold that your plants will love.  They’ll grow stronger and healthier, without poison pesticides or chemical fertilizers. 

Several towns in our area offer low cost compost bins, or you can build your own. Click here for more info


Are Hazards Hiding in your House?    Listen
Recorded at WATD by Steve Herrmann (Hanover), Michelle Roberts (Abington) and Claire Sullivan (SSRC)

“The South Shore Recycling Cooperative and Covanta want to remind you to handle household hazards with care.     Chemicals that kill crabgrass, clear clogs and dissolve paint can also make us sick.  Here are some tips to stop poisoning our planet:

First, choose the least toxic product to get the job done.   Simple soapy water cleans most surfaces.  Latex paint is easier to use than oil paint, the fumes won’t make you sick, and you can just dry up the excess and put it in the trash.  And electronic thermostats don’t contain the toxic mercury that analog ones do.

Second, fight the urge to buy the bulky bargain!  Safe disposal of hazardous products can cost more than what you paid for them; improper dumping can be downright dangerous.

Third, if you do find hazards in your house, dispose of them properly. 

South Shore Recycling Cooperative towns host about a dozen hazardous product collections each year. And you can trade your toxic mercury fever thermometers for a free digital one from Covanta at SEMASS!

For more information, check your local paper or click here.


Avoid hazardous products    Listen

Recorded at WATD by Steve Herrmann (Hanover) and Claire Sullivan (SSRC)

30 seconds

S:  Hey hon, paint thinner was on sale, I got 5 gallons for only $15!

C:  But didn’t you only need a quart? 

S:  Well, yeah, but it was so cheap I bought oil paint instead of latex for the playroom too. 

C:  Ugh, that stuff gives me a headache!  And what’ll we do with all the leftovers?

S:  No problem, the South Shore Recycling Cooperative’s always advertising hazardous waste days

C:  Do you know what it costs to go to those?

S:  You mean we have to pay?

C:  Well, our taxes do, it’s over $40 for each 15 gallons

S:  Maybe it wasn’t such a bargain…

C:  Please get latex paint next time, dear!


The Cost of Trash     Listen
Recorded at WATD by Bob Griffin (Marshfield) & Claire Sullivan (SSRC)

B:  Do you know what it costs to make your trash go away?  If you’re a typical American, you toss out a ton of trash each year, at home, work, school, ball games... * In the good old days, it all went in the dump on the edge of town.  But they were closed ‘cause they were poisoning our water. 

C:  Now your trash is trucked to high tech landfills and waste combustors, and guess what?  They’re expensive to build and run, and we don’t have enough to manage all our discards. **

B:  If you live in a town where you pay only for what you throw out, you waste a lot less than you used to.*** But no matter where you live, you’re paying for disposal, in your property tax, trash fee, or rent.

C:  The fifteen towns in the South Shore Recycling Cooperative spent about $17 million last year to haul and dispose household trash, an average of $150/ton, and that’s just the tip of the iceberg.  Whether it’s burned or buried, plenty of good stuff that could have been recycled is gone to waste. ****

B:  Recycling saves money and more.  A little effort does make a big difference.

* U.S. EPA Office of Solid Waste

** Mass. DEP Solid Waste Master Plan

*** Pay as you Throw : Unit-based Pricing for Municipalities

**** 2003 Tellus Institute Report, "Waste Reduction Program Assessment and Analysis for Massachusetts"


Recycling bottles and cans saves energy     Listen
Recorded at WATD by Bob Griffin (Marshfield) and Claire Sullivan (SSRC)

B:  Hey, what do you think you’re doing?

C:  Huh?  I’m throwing out my empty water bottle.  So what?

B:  So what?  Do you know what that thing’s made of?

C:  Plastic, duh

B:  And what’s plastic made from?

C:  uh, I guess I don’t know.  I suppose you do?

B:  Yup.  Plastic’s made from crude oil!

C:  Really?  Where’d you hear that?

B:  It’s on the South Shore Recycling Cooperative website, ssrc.info.  It took over 2 ounces of oil to make that bottle! * 

C:  That’s not much.

B:  Well, not that much, but if you throw one out every day, it adds up.  And it takes even more to make an aluminum can from ore, about half a can of fuel!**

C:  Wow, that does add up.  Let’s see, 6 ounces a day, 365 days/year…

B:  That’s like 20 gallons a year!  That makes a lot of greenhouse gases too.***

C:  So what am I supposed to do?

B:  Well, if you and your friends recycled all your bottles and cans, it would save most of that energy.

C:  So I’m supposed to walk over there and put them in the special bin?

B:  Well, I wouldn’t dare tell you what to do.  But a little effort does make a big difference.

* Bottled Water: Pouring resources down the drain  Earth Policy Institute

 

** Can Manufacturers Institute 1993. The Great Aluminum Can Roundup

*** 1 gallon of fuel (about 8 lbs.) consumes about 10 lbs. of oxygen (O2) when burned, and generates about 24 lbs of carbon dioxide (CO2).  Here’s the stoichiometry:

2CH2 (basic unit of fossil fuel, MW 28 g/mole) + 3O2 (oxygen, MW 32 g/mole)à 2CO2 (carbon dioxide, MW 88 g/mole) + 2H2O (water, MW 36 g/mole)


Recycle everywhere: at home, at school and at work    Listen

Recorded at WATD 1/20/06 by Anthony Rose (Weymouth), Courtney McCarthy (Abington)

Anthony:  Hey, how was your trip to the Alps?

Courtney:  It was awesome!  We were way up in this little town by the Materhorn. You know, even though they‘re in the middle of nowhere, they had recycling bins, even on the slopes!  The airport at Zurich had them too.  I was so surprised, I took pictures! 

A:  I think it’s surprising that more places around here don’t recycle.  I’m so used to sorting my trash at home, I feel funny putting paper and cans with the trash at my busboy job, or hanging out at the mall.  My cousin told me that his school doesn’t even recycle!

C:  My Mom set up paper collection at her office last month, and she’s really psyched.  She got bins to go next to their wastebaskets, and found a company that put a paper container by their dumpster.  The South Shore Recycling Cooperative helped her, at ssrc.info.  She said there’s hardly any trash now, so they’re getting a smaller dumpster!    She’s hoping for a bonus, since it will save her company money too.

A:  Next time I’m at work, I’ll suggest it to my boss.  Maybe I’ll get a raise!

C:  We should tell the mall manager too, maybe we’ll get a discount.

A:  Yeah, right!  We’d probably have to settle for the satisfaction making a difference.


Trash causes global warming      Listen
Recorded at WATD 1/20/06, by Rebecca  (Abington) and Anthony Rose (Weymouth)

Rebecca:  Anthony, Mom said to take out the trash.

Anthony:  But it’s freezing outside!

R:  I know, but if we keep putting out lots of trash, it will warm up.

A:  Huh?  What are you talking about?

R:  Global warming.  Our trash gets burned, and makes greenhouse gases.  I kind of wish it went to the landfill instead, methane is so much more effective than carbon dioxide.

A:  But why do you want to make global warming worse?

R:  I want to live on the beach.

A:  But the beach is only a few blocks away!

R:  Right, and if sea level comes up enough, we’ll be beachfront!  Melt those icebergs!

A:  Hey!  I put all these papers, bottles and cans in the recycling bin!  Why’d you put them into the rubbish?

R:  I read on the South Shore Recycling Cooperative’s website, ssrc.info, that it takes a lot more fuel to make paper, bottles and cans from, ahem, virgin materials than from recycled stuff.  Burn more fuel, more greenhouse gas, before we know it those obnoxious Sullivans across the street will be underwater, and I’ll be having beach parties in the front yard!

A:  You’re nuts. 


South Shore Business Recycling Partnership    Listen
Recorded ay WATD 1/20/06 by Janice McCarthy (Rockland BOH), Claire Sullivan (SSRC)

(phone ringing)  Janice;  Hello?

Claire:  Hi, it’s Anthony’s mom.  Is this Courtney’s mother?

Janice:  Yes, this is Janice, is there a problem?

Jim:  Oh, no.  Anthony told me that you set up a recycling system at work, and got help from some Cooperative.  We throw out a lot of paper at the agency, and I wanted to find out how to recycle it.  Anthony’s been bugging me about how we’re destroying the planet, clear cutting forests, global warming . . .

Janice:  Yeah, I’ve been hearing it from Courtney too, so I looked into it, and she makes some good points.  Our town’s a member of the South Shore Recycling Cooperative.  One page of their website is about their business recycling partnership, and you can call for advice on how to collect recyclables and get them picked up.  They even gave us bins, but I wouldn’t wait too long if you want some.  You wouldn’t believe how much paper a realty office generates!  We hardly have any trash now, so we downsized our dumpster, which is much cheaper.

Jim:  What about shredded documents?

Janice:  Those go right in, and we reuse the plastic bags.

Jim:  Great. What’s their web address?

Janice:  ssrc.info.  I must say, a little effort has made a big difference.

 


Business Recycling Partnership 

(Please note: this service is no longer available.  For Business Recycling assistance, go to RecyclingWorksMass)         Listen
Recorded at WATD 1/20/06  by Janice McCarthy Rockland BOH), Claire Sullivan (SSRC)

Claire:  Want to cut costs in your business?  Look no further than your trash can.  If you’re business isn’t recycling, it’s throwing away money.

Janice: The South Shore Recycling Cooperative can help your business get more out of its waste, with advice setting up on-site recycling collection and pick up.  And while supplies last, you can get office recycling bins through the its Business Recycling Partnership.

C:  You’ll save on trash, and can even get paid for certain materials!

J:  For more information, go to ssrc.info.  Recycle.  A little effort makes a big difference.